Portraits…

… and a look at where I’m now.

2017 is almost half over, so this might be a good moment to reflect on how the year has been so far in terms of photography. To put it bluntly: I think I’ve had better years. The year started out strong with a trip to Morocco which provided plenty of photo opportunities, and I came back with a good number of images with which I was more than satisfied. But back in Berlin’s ‘grey season’, that long miserable sunless season into which autumn, winter and spring have nowadays morphed, things started to look bleak. Blame it on the weather, blame it on extended stress at work, or on just a general lack of energy, but I found it near impossible to take decent photos, especially street photos. I found it hard to get excited, neither about people nor light nor context. If on occasion I did  shoot some photos, the results were less than stellar and this discouraged me even more. Add to that that I felt increasingly uncomfortable accosting people and asking their permission to photograph them, something which I had overcome easy enough in previous years in order to pursue what I like best in street photography, i.e. street portraiture. I’ve only recently started doing this again, on a recent trip to London and lately also back here in Berlin.

DSCF7915Now I know I’m not the first photographer to hit a low and to feel uninspired, and I know it will pass. Anyway, this blog post is not about me wallowing in self pity. It’s really about the parts that did work.

As street photography left me uninspired, I retreated into a comfort zone of sorts by turning to the portraiture of friends and acquaintances. Now, portrait photography was something I wanted to get into more anyway, so it didn’t necessarily feel like a retreat but a step forward. I took part in a portrait workshop which not only let me work with a model but also with other people who were comfortable in having their picture taken and from which I stepped away with good results. The work shop was about portrait photography in available light, and I have another workshop lined up for portraiture in artificial light. 

Normally I wait with the ‘best of’ series until the end of the year. But I figured I could motivate myself by actually taking a look at what I achieved rather than moping about what I didn’t. So I put together this set with a selection of the portraits that I have taken so far this year. They include photos from the workshop, portraits of my friends and a couple of street portraits as well. All were shot on Fuji X-Series cameras, notably my new X-T20, it’s predecessor the X-T10, and the faithful old X-E2 which I keep around. Enjoy.

Links:

Portraits 2017

Portraits 2016

more people photographs

(Note: this is an updated version of an entry posted earlier)

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Marrakesh Colours And Textures


I’m currently still sorting through the hundreds of photos which I took on my three week trip through Morocco, and after the street portrait & photography set, I have now published another set in the Travelogue section of my site, this one focusing on the colours of Marrakesh. Colour is what visitors tend to associate with Moroccon cities: above all the warm reds, but also rich blues, bright yellow and orange offset against white, ochre and other Earth colours. And indeed, the colours are astounding, but even more so are the intricacies of the designs combining the colours, whether they are mosaics, tiles, paintings, reliefs or graffiti.

img_4687-1In Marrakesh, I was staying in a Riad in the heart of the medieval, maze-like medina. I only had to step outside the door and walk down whichever alley I chose to be submerged in the richness of Moroccon design. Haunting the medina in the early hours of the morning and capturing the colours and the textures was certainly a highlight of my stay in Marrakesh.  Quite frankly, this random walking through unknown parts of the city is an activity which I enjoy so much more than sightseeing – even though this activity was lost on the locals, who kept pointing out to me that there were no sights whereever I was heading.

The set of photos I chose to upload focuses mostly on details.  I included the photos that are about what I enjoyed most in Morocco, the unique feeling that emanates from the colourful, playful designs. Apart from the photos from the median,  there are also some taken in the cheerfully blue Jardin Majorelle (erstwhile home of the late fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent), the Menara Garden and the Saadian Tombs. There are some photos from a couple of tanneries where leather is made from cow and goat hide. There are three black and white images from the New City as well. I did include a number of street photographs as did not want the set to solely focus on design. After all, any portrait of a city is only complete with the people in it.

All except two images were captured with a Fujifilm X-T10 camera, the remaining two were captured with the iPhone Hipstamatic app.

Enjoy the Marrakesh Colours and Textures.

Click here for more travelogue galleries.

City Scape: Potsdamer Platz

Potsdamer Platz, Berlin. Camera: Fujifilm X-T10

Almost 20 years after it was built, Potsdamer Platz still divides opinions. Some hate it, some shrug it off, some like it. For some, it’s a symbol of Berlin’s post-reunion megolamania, a failed wanna-be Disney-Manhattan. However, for a city that does not take many chances on cutting-edge, innovative architecture, Potsdamer Platz is remarkable in that here at least are a few designs which did not originate in a Lego box. Personnaly, I like it.

Streets of Berlin: Candid Street Photography



This year, one particular focus of my photography was street portraiture, i.e.
posed portraits of people encountered in the street. Apart from this, I did continue to capture candid pictures of people throughout Berlin. While 2016 is not quite over yet, I have recently posted a selection of this year’s best such images: Streets of Berlin 2016.

The set is a combination of different styles of street photography. When capturing people on the street, I usually approach them closely enough to capture emotions and expressions, but I also try to include context and background. Depending on the setting, though, it’s also fun to take a step back and let the scenery take center sage, so to speak, such as in the image depicted below.

People sometimes ask me if I prefer to shoot in colour or in black and white. My answer: if there is colour, I prefer colour; else black and white. What this means is: I do love working with colours, so if the colours in a scene are right, I capture them. It’s one of the reasons why I love photographing in places like India or Italy: the colours are just gorgeous. But in settings where the colours are drab, distracting, or just not interesting, I go for black and white. Black and white also seems to add intimacy to a portrait. Sometimes, though, the distinction isn’t that rational, and I go with my mood. However, I usually decide how to shoot beforehand – I very rarely change colour to b&w in post-production. About two thirds of the photos in this set are in colour and the rest are monochrome.

Most of the photos were taken with my two Fuji cameras, the X-T10 and the X-E2; which have become my cameras of choice over the past year. However, there are also a couple of iPhone photos inclouded in the set. As the saying goes, the best camera is always the one you carry with you….

Streets of Berlin: Candid Street Photography 2016

More links:

Night Lights

I may have mentioned this earlier, but I love the combination of the Fujifilm X-Series cameras’ low light capability coupled with the 35mm 1.2 lens. Here are a few more shots taken around Berlin at night with both the X-T10 and the X-E2. While black and white works better on account of the higher ISO settings, coming out incredibly sharp and noise-free, the colour ones aren’t so shabby either ….



Here are a couple more examples of night time photography:

Personal Portraits


I posted a new set of photos to my web site, consisting of a series of portraits which I made of friends and acquaintances over the last year, entitled ‘Up Close & Personal 3′. It joins two earlier sets of the same name, the first one of which features analog portraits, while the second one consists mainly of photos taken with the iPhone. This time around, the set features mostly photos taken with Fujifilm X-Series cameras, but also some Leica and a couple of iPhone ones.

More of my people photography can be found [here].

Enjoy.